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Diabetes Fact Sheet

Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in the United States. According to the CDC’s (Centers for Disease Control) National Diabetes Statistics Report for 2014, cases of diabetes have increased almost 13% over the last four years (29.1 million in 2012 vs. 25.8 million in 2010). Below is a summary of the latest diabetes statistics included in the CDC’s report. 


How Many People Have Diabetes?

  • 29.1 million people, or 9.3% of the U.S. population, have diabetes, including 8.1 million people who have diabetes but have not yet been diagnosed (All ages, 2012).
  • Diabetes impacts all social, economic, and ethnic backgrounds.
  • Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, affecting approximately 1.5 million people.


New Cases of Diabetes in Adults and Children

  • Among people 20 years or older, 1.7 million were newly-diagnosed with diabetes (2012) – approximately 4,657 new cases of diabetes are diagnosed each day.
  • About 208,000 people younger than 20 years of age have been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2). This represents 0.25% of all people in this age group (2012).
  • The incidence of type 1 diabetes is significantly higher in people under age 20. According to a 2008-2009 study of 23,525 youths with diabetes, 78% were newly-diagnosed with type 1 diabetes vs. 22% who were newly-diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.*


Incidence of Diabetes Complications

  • Diabetes can affect many parts of the body and is associated with serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-limb amputation, among other conditions.

Heart Disease, Heart Attack and Stroke

  • In 2003-2006, after adjusting for population age differences, cardiovascular disease death rates were about 1.7 times higher among adults aged 18 years or older with diagnosed diabetes than among adults without diagnosed diabetes.
  • In 2010, after adjusting for population age differences, hospitalization rates for heart attack were 1.8 times higher among adults aged 20 years or older with diagnosed diabetes than among adults without diagnosed diabetes.
  • In 2010, after adjusting for population age differences, hospitalization rates for stroke were 1.5 times higher among adults with diagnosed diabetes aged 20 years or older compared to those without diagnosed diabetes.

Blindness and Eye Problems

  • In 2005-2008, of adults with diabetes aged 40 years or older, 4.2 million (28.5%) people had diabetic retinopathy, damage to the small blood vessels in the retina that may result in loss of vision.
  • In 2005-2008, of adults with diabetes aged 40 years or older, 655,000 (4.4%) had advanced diabetes retinopathy that could lead to severe vision loss.

Kidney Disease

  • Diabetes was listed as the primary cause of kidney failure in 44% of all new cases in 2011.
  • In 2011, 49,677 people of all ages began treatment for kidney failure due to diabetes; and a total of 228,924 people of all ages with kidney failure were living on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant.

Amputations

  • In 2010, about 73,000 non-traumatic lower-limb amputations were performed in adults aged 20 years or older with diagnosed diabetes.
  • About 60% of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations among people aged 20 years or older occur in people with diagnosed diabetes.

Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemic Crisis

  • In 2011, about 282,000 emergency room visits for adults aged 18 years or older had hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) as the first-listed diagnosis and diabetes as another diagnosis.
  • In 2011, about 175,000 emergency room visits for people of all ages had hyperglycemic (high blood sugar levels) crisis as the first-listed diagnosis.


Diabetes is a Deadly Disease

  • Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010 based on the 69,071 death certificates in which diabetes was listed as the underlying cause of death. In 2010, diabetes was mentioned as a cause of death in a total of 234,051 death certificates.
  • Diabetes may be underreported as a cause of death. Studies have found that only about 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had diabetes listed anywhere on the death certificate and about 10% to 15% had it listed as the underlying cause of death.


The Cost of Diabetes

  • In 2012, the total cost of diabetes in the U.S. was $245 billion.
  • Of that, $176 billion accounted for direct medical costs. After adjusting for age and sex differences, average medical expenditures among people with diagnosed diabetes were 2.3 times higher than people without diabetes.
  • $69 billion was attributed to indirect costs (disability, work loss, premature death).


More About Diabetes

  • Diabetes is caused by the body’s inability to create or effectively use its own insulin, which is produced by islet cells found in the pancreas. Insulin helps regulate blood sugar (glucose) levels – providing energy to body cells and tissues.
  • Without insulin, the body’s cells would be starved, causing dehydration and destruction of body tissue.
  • People with type 1 diabetes must have insulin delivered by injection or a pump to survive.
  • Many people with type 2 diabetes can control their blood glucose by following a healthy meal plan and a program of regular physical activity, losing excess weight, and taking medications. Medications for each individual with diabetes will often change during the course of the disease. Insulin also is commonly used to control blood glucose in people with type 2 diabetes.



Source: Centers for Disease Control National Diabetes Statistics Report 2014; National Institutes of Health
*SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study

 

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